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When migration is not migration

      A review article on absorbable infrior vena cava filters by Wong et al
      • Wong J.
      • Tan M.
      • Bakhshayesh P.
      A review of preclinical absorbale inferior vena cava filters.
      offered an explanation of the apparent increased migration of absorbable filters during the later weeks after deployment in animals (from weeks 5 to 32) arising from “polydioxanone suture (PDS) [that] becomes increasingly resorbed and less embedded to the caval wall with time.” However, the stent portions of the PDS absorbable filters referenced by Eggers et al
      • Eggers M.
      • McArthur M.
      • Figueira T.
      • Abdelsalam M.
      • Dixon K.
      • Pageon L.
      • et al.
      Pilot in-vivo study of an absorbable polydioxanone vena cava filter.
      ,
      • Eggers M.
      • Dria S.
      • Rousselle S.
      • Urtz M.
      • Albright R.
      • Will A.
      • et al.
      Randomized controlled study of an absorbable vena cava filter in a porcine model.
      and Huang et al
      • Huang S.
      • Eggers M.
      • McArthur M.
      • Dixon K.
      • Dria S.
      • Steele J.
      • et al.
      Safety and efficacy of an absorbable IVC filter for the prevention of pulmonary embolism in swine.
      are completely endothelialized (locked-in with 0.5-1.0 mm neointima hyperplasia) within 2 weeks of deployment, rendering migration highly unlikely (Fig). Hence, the absorbable filters referenced in Eggers et al
      • Eggers M.
      • McArthur M.
      • Figueira T.
      • Abdelsalam M.
      • Dixon K.
      • Pageon L.
      • et al.
      Pilot in-vivo study of an absorbable polydioxanone vena cava filter.
      ,
      • Eggers M.
      • Dria S.
      • Rousselle S.
      • Urtz M.
      • Albright R.
      • Will A.
      • et al.
      Randomized controlled study of an absorbable vena cava filter in a porcine model.
      and Huang et al
      • Huang S.
      • Eggers M.
      • McArthur M.
      • Dixon K.
      • Dria S.
      • Steele J.
      • et al.
      Safety and efficacy of an absorbable IVC filter for the prevention of pulmonary embolism in swine.
      are less likely to migrate with increasing indwell.
      Figure thumbnail gr1
      FigAbsorbable filter endothelialization demonstrated by, A, gross necropsy at 19 days after deployment
      • Eggers M.
      • McArthur M.
      • Figueira T.
      • Abdelsalam M.
      • Dixon K.
      • Pageon L.
      • et al.
      Pilot in-vivo study of an absorbable polydioxanone vena cava filter.
      and, B, hematoxylin and eosin stained inferior vena cava wall at 14 days after deployment.
      • Huang S.
      • Eggers M.
      • McArthur M.
      • Dixon K.
      • Dria S.
      • Steele J.
      • et al.
      Safety and efficacy of an absorbable IVC filter for the prevention of pulmonary embolism in swine.
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      References

        • Wong J.
        • Tan M.
        • Bakhshayesh P.
        A review of preclinical absorbale inferior vena cava filters.
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        • McArthur M.
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        Pilot in-vivo study of an absorbable polydioxanone vena cava filter.
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        • Dria S.
        • Rousselle S.
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        • Will A.
        • et al.
        Randomized controlled study of an absorbable vena cava filter in a porcine model.
        J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2018; 29: S29
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        • Eggers M.
        • McArthur M.
        • Dixon K.
        • Dria S.
        • Steele J.
        • et al.
        Safety and efficacy of an absorbable IVC filter for the prevention of pulmonary embolism in swine.
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      Linked Article

      • A review of preclinical absorbable inferior vena cava filters
        Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic DisordersVol. 9Issue 2
        • Preview
          Absorbable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) could be more effective and safer than standard IVCFs in theory, as they will self-resorb over time, thus rendering the need for filter retrieval and the risks associated with it unnecessary. This scoping review aims to evaluate the design of current absorbable IVCFs, review the development phase of the absorbable IVCFs, assess the efficacy of the absorbable IVCFs and their complications, and discuss the limitations and areas for future research.
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